TPACK Vanity (v. 2.0)

April 23, 2015 § 2 Comments

citation-meme

Back in 2006 Matt and I took a bunch of work that we had been doing in the area of technology integration for teaching and pulled it together into one broad theoretical framework and published it in TCRecord. The TPACK framework as it has come to be known has been incredibly influential—far more than we could have imagined. As far as citations go, this is what it looks like on Google Citation (graph generated dynamically by polling Google Scholar citations for Mishra & Koehler, 2006). See Matt’s page about this here.

Citations of Mishra & Koehler (2006) over time

The recent issue of Educational Technology journal (that I mentioned previously here) has an article by Nyland, Anderson, Beckstrom, Boren, Thomas & West where they review a decade of publications  (2003-2012) in the  Journal of Educational Computing Research (JECR) to see the kinds of broad patterns of work emerge. I was gratified to learn that the Koehler & Mishra (2005) article was the most cited paper of that decade – with 318 citations (actually Google Scholar currently puts the number of citations at 508 which may just be a function of when the review was conducted).

Koehler, M. J. & Mishra, P. (2005). What happens when teachers design educational technology? The development of Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge. Journal of Educational Computing Research. 32(2), 131-152. [PDF]

More interestingly, the reviewers also examined the top-cited paper for each year of the analysis. Under these criteria 3 of the 10 most cited articles in the journal are related to TPACK! You can read the complete review by going here:

Nyland, R. Anderson, N., Beckstromm T., Thomas, R., & West, R.E. (2015).  Educational Technology Research Journals: Journal of Educational Computing Research, 2003-2012Educational Technology. 55(2), 43-48. 

Article in WEF Global Information Technology Report

April 22, 2015 § Leave a Comment

WEF-meme

Everybody has heard of the  World Economic Forum (WEF) annual meeting in Davos, Switzerland. As Wikipedia says, “The meeting brings together some 2,500 top business leaders, international political leaders, selected intellectuals, and journalists to discuss the most pressing issues facing the world, including health and the environment.” The WEF is more than the Davos meeting, however. It is an “independent international organization committed to improving the state of the world by engaging business, political, academic, and other leaders of society to shape global, regional, and industry agendas.” Website at http://www.weforum.org/

The WEF recently came out with the Global Information Technology Report 2015. The theme this year was ICT for Inclusive Growth. I was invited to write a chapter in the report by Anurag Behar, vice-chancellor of the Azim Premji University and co-CEO of the Azim Premji Foundation. You can access the complete report by clicking the link above or read the PDF of our chapter by clicking on the title below.

Behar, A., & Mishra, P. (2015). ICTs in Schools: Why focusing policy and resources on educators, not children, will improve educational outcomes. In ICT for Inclusive Growth: Global Information Technology Report 2015. World Economic Forum.

Sadly this doesn’t mean that I am headed to Davos anytime soon… but it is good to have our ideas out there, hopefully to be read by “business, political, academic, and other leaders of society” and through that, hopefully help “shape global, regional, and industry agendas.”

Interview in Educational Technology Journal

April 21, 2015 § Leave a Comment

interview-meme

I was recently interviewed by the journal Educational Technology: The magazine for managers of change in education as a part of their series Q & A with Ed Tech Leaders. The interviews are conducted by contributing editors, Susan M. Fulgham and Michael F. Shaughnessy. I would like the thank the two of them for their patience — since I was more than a little tardy in getting back to them. But they were always more than gracious and for that I am grateful.

You can download and read the entire interview here: Mishra Interview ET 2015.

I am also including the interview below in HTML format – since that lets me add links to resources, articles, and people, something I could not do in the published interview, sometimes in the form of parenthetical notes, often as in-text links. That said, if you have to quote from the interview please go with the published PDF above.

« Read the rest of this entry »

Mathematical paradoxes & ambigrams: New article

April 7, 2015 § Leave a Comment

paradox-meme

I have always loved paradoxes so it is with great pleasure that the fourth article in our series on Art and Math (co-authored with my friend Gaurav Bhatnagar and published by At Right Angles) focuses on paradoxes and visual wordplay. It was great fun coming up with a range of designs on this topic — in fact we had so much material that we had to break it down into two articles.

You can download all of the articles in the series Of Art & Math by following the links below

  1. Introducing Ambigrams: Blog postDirect link to PDF
  2. Symmetry: Blog post | direct link to PDF
  3. Self-SimilarityDirect link to PDF
  4. Paradoxes (Part 1): Direct to link to PDF

Poetry, Daisies And Cobras: Math Class With Manjul Bhargava

March 25, 2015 § 1 Comment

An amazing presentation by Manjul Bhargava (Fields medal winner in Mathematics) to school children in India. See how he effortlessly combines poetry, nature, music and mathematics.

Watch an excerpt on YouTube below or the complete video here.

YouTube Preview Image

 

 

Deep-Play on Michigan Radio Stateside with Cynthia Canty

March 3, 2015 § Leave a Comment

I am a huge fan of Stateside with Cynthia Canty, a radio show on Michigan Radio. So imagine my excitement when I was interviewed by her about my ongoing exhibition (Deep-Play: Creativity in Math & Art through Visual Wordplay) at the MSU Museum. The interview was recorded last week but ran this afternoon – and sadly I missed it (because I am in Las Vegas for the SITE2015 conference). But the interview is now on their website and you can listen to it by clicking the link below (which takes you to the Michigan Radio Page for my interview…

MSU exhibit explores creativity through art and math

…or listen to it directly here…

Deep-Play: Creativity in Math & Art through Visual Wordplay

March 1, 2015 § Leave a Comment

I have been creating ambigrams for years now… and I feel extremely lucky that what started as a personal interest and passion has led to some wonderful experiences and learning. These include a series of articles on the mathematics behind these visual designs and now an exhibition at the MSU Museum.

Since December the Creativity-Art-Science Gallery at the MSU Museum has hosted an exhibition of my work – and it has been wonderful. We had an informal gallery-walk a couple of week-ends ago and more than a 100 friends and colleagues showed up at the event. Which was truly gratifying.
I was also given an opportunity to present my work at EduPalooza 2015, a creative arts event at the College of Education a week or so ago. Jon Good recorded my talk and I took a bit of time over the past week to create a video of my comments synched to my slides. You can see this video below.  I think it is a good introduction to ambigrams, mathematics and also includes some interesting stories about my experiences with creating and sharing these with the world at large.

Here are some links if you want to learn more about my work in this area. « Read the rest of this entry »

EPET at SITE 2015

February 22, 2015 § 1 Comment

EPETatSITE15

The annual SITE conference is an fixture in my life in the spring semester. This year is no exception. What is interesting is the manner in which the EPET program at MSU has been increasing its presence at the conference. Above is a screen-shot of my calendar of from Tuesday March 3 to Friday March 6, listing ALL the presentations that students, faculty, graduates of MSU are involved in. Below that is a list of all the presentations. Thanks to Spencer Greenhalgh for taking time to create this list. He has also assembled all of these (plus basic info like keynotes, lunches, etc.) into a Google Calendar, which you can add to your own iCal / Google Calendar/ other calendar apps.” Which is exactly what I did. Enjoy.

Also, if we missed anybody let us know and I will add to the list right away.

« Read the rest of this entry »

TPACK Newsletter #22: February 2015

February 9, 2015 § Leave a Comment

TPACK BUTTON

TPACK Newsletter, Issue #22: February 2015

Welcome to the sixth anniversary issue and twenty-second edition of the (approximately bimonthly) TPACK Newsletter! TPACK work is continuing worldwide. This document contains recent updates to that work that we hope will be interesting and useful to you, our subscribers.

If you are not sure what TPACK is, please surf over to http://tpack.org to find out more.

Gratuitous Quote About Knowledge
“Without knowledge, action is useless, and knowledge without action is futile.”

– Abu Bakr

In This Issue
-1. Gratuitous Quote About Knowledge
0. In This Issue (You are here.)
1. TPACK Newsletter Update
2. Recent TPACK Publications
3. Recent TPACK-Related Dissertations
4. Recent TPACK Presentations
5. Call for TPACK-related Manuscripts
6. TPACK Newsletter Suggested Citation
7. Learning and Doing More with TPACK
–. Un-numbered miscellaneous stuff at the end

1. TPACK Newsletter Update
The TPACK Newsletter has been published via the tpack.news email list since January 2009. It has 1227 subscribers currently. Subscription numbers have held steady (+ or – 1% to 3%) since October 2011. « Read the rest of this entry »

Blast from the past: Theories and memory

February 6, 2015 § Leave a Comment

theory

Ambigram for the word “Theory” by Punya Mishra

My first real research study was one that I conducted back when I was a graduate student under the mentorship of Bill Brewer. It was designed as a classic educational psychology memory study and though I have done little along those lines recently, it is a study that I am quite proud of. For one reason or another I had not posted it on to my website and when I came across it today, while chatting with a doctoral student, I felt it was time to dust it off and offer it to the world, once again. Here is the reference and abstract and a link to the actual article (below the jump).

Sharing one of my newer ambigram designs, for the word “theory”, see above, was an added bonus.

« Read the rest of this entry »

Mobile Technology in Teacher Education, Conference Galway 2015

February 1, 2015 § Leave a Comment

I was recently invited to keynote The First International Conference on Mobile Technology in Teacher Education (MiTE 2015). The conference was organized by the School of Education, National University of Ireland, Galway. Kudos to the organizers (main point of contact being Seán Ó Grádaigh) for a great conference. I had a wonderful time, making some new friends and engaging in some great conversations.

Here are some links, recently shared by Seán, for those who want to get a sense of how the conference went.

You can see the MiTE Program Booklet and/or browse the photo gallery, or watch a synopsis video

MiTE Conference 2015 from Seán on Vimeo.

Finally, follow the following link to access slides from the presentations

R. K. Laxman, RIP

January 26, 2015 § Leave a Comment

RK-Laxman-Common-Man

R. K. Laxman(24 October 1921 – 26 January 2015)

Embodied Thinking: New article

January 11, 2015 § Leave a Comment

sculpture-chilePhoto: Punya Mishra; Santiago, Chile, 2014

Rethinking Technology & Creativity in the 21st Century is a series of articles we have been writing for Tech Trends. The latest article in the series has just ben published. This article focuses on Embodied Thinking as a key trans-disciplinary habit of mind often used by creative people across disciplines. Our previous articles have looked at PerceivingPatterning, and Abstracting. Future pieces will look at Modeling, Play, and Synthesizing. Below is a link to the latest article (you can see all the articles in the series by going here).

Henriksen, D., Good, J., & Mishra, P. & the Deep-Play Research Group (in press). Embodied Thinking as a trans-disciplinary habit of mind. Tech Trends (58)6. p. 3-7

Inside-Out: Happy 2015

December 27, 2014 § 1 Comment

Every winter break (for the past six years) our family creates a video to welcome the new year. This is no ordinary video. It requires days of discussion, planning, construction, shooting, and editing.

Our videos never feature us (expect maybe a still-shot of the entire family towards the end) but are usually typographical in nature. There is some kind of visual illusion involved, sometimes a play on words synchronized to music. The videos have become more elaborate over the years and the challenge, of course, is to create something that tops what we had done in the past years. As you can imagine this has become more and more difficult as the years go by. What makes things more complicated is that we have no budget to speak of ($10 is around as much as we have ever spent in any given year). If you want to see all the videos in the series, or find out more about how this year’s video was created, scroll down to the end of this post.

Working on these videos has led to is some great family moments, as we argue, discuss, collaborate and create. Below is our latest video, titled Inside-Out: Happy 2015. Raise the volume of your device to max, click to make the video full-screen and hit play! Enjoy.

Inside-Out: Happy 2015
From Shreya, Soham, Smita & Punya

*****

Videos from years past

Here are links to the videos from the previous years (along with some other videos made as a family):

*****

The making of Inside-Out: 

The idea for the video came from examples such as this one on Youtube – with some creative improvisation by us. Essentially what you have here are not cubes but shells of cubes. The inner shell, the concave end (imagine the inner corner of a room) has the numbers 2, 0, 1 and 4 written on them while the other side, the convex side, has the numbers 2, 0, 1 and 5 written on them. The letters were projected onto the cubes (using a computer and a projector) and written in such a way that they would be readable only when seen from ONE specific viewpoint. These “cubes” were then stuck onto wooden barbecue skewers that were held up by poking them into little boxes of playdoh. All four of these were then placed on a wooden board placed on a standard Lazy Susan (nabbed from the kitchen) which allowed them to be rotated at will. All this was placed in front of our living-room TV (covered with black sheets). After some experimentation with the lighting we had our final setup.

When seen with one eye (or through a camera), even the inside of a cube looks like a cube (due to the lack of depth perception). What this meant is that when you see the “cubes” for the first time you are not actually seeing cubes but rather the concave shell of a cube. Our eyes however, see a cube and when tilted or rotated slightly they appear to move in strange counter-intuitive ways. A full rotation leads you to seeing the convex end (with the numbers 2015). The setup was filmed using a Nikon D7000 camera and edited on iMovie. Music was provided by the amazing collection of free music provided by Kevin McLeod (at Incompetech.com). Below is a photo of the setup

IMG_2008

 

New webinar on TPACK

November 1, 2014 § 1 Comment

webinar

Matt Koehler and I recently participated on a webinar titled Teachers as Designers of Technology, Pedagogy, and Content (TPACK) organized by edWeb.net and Commonsense Education. We had over 200+ viewers from all over the world (New Zeeland, Israel, Morroco, Canada being some of the countries represented). The webinar was quite fun and you can view it in its entirety here

Help with research (max 10 mins). Please share

October 23, 2014 § Leave a Comment

survey-meme

This is a request for help. If you are an educator (K12 teacher or administrator, higher ed faculty, corporate trainer etc.) we would like approximately 10 minutes of your time to complete a survey regarding the challenges faced by educators in the 21st century and the kinds of knowledge and/or skills needed to face these challenges. The survey should not take more than 8-12 minutes of your time to complete. Your responses will be confidential and fully anonymous. Your participation is voluntary, though we sincerely hope you will respond. Click on the link below to access the survey.

http://tiny.cc/teach21st/

Also, we would appreciate your forwarding this message to others. Here is a handy tweet you can copy and paste on to your twitter feed or Facebook post if you like

Please complete this survey on 21st century learning http://tiny.cc/teach21st/ Thank you @punyamishra

Thank you very much for considering this request and please contact me punya@msu.edu if you have any questions.

Thank you, Chile!

October 14, 2014 § Leave a Comment

Chile


Rotate

I spent the past seven days in Chile, six days in Santiago and one in Valpariso. It was absolutely wonderful. My trip was sponsored by the Faculty of Education at the Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Chile (PUC is one of the nation’s premier universities), as well as support from the Enlaces project of the Ministry of Education and UNESCO.  This trip builds on a memorandum of understanding recently signed between MSU and PUC and focused on the role of ICT in education.

A lot happened during the week – here is my attempt to capture some of the highlights.
« Read the rest of this entry »

Abstracting as a trans-disciplinary habit of mind

October 13, 2014 § Leave a Comment


The next article on our series on Rethinking Technology & Creativity in the 21st Century has just been published. The past few articles have focused specifically on trans-disciplinary thinking i.e. a set of cognitive skills that cut across disciplinary boundaries. Building on Michele & Robert Root-Bernstein’s work in this area we list seven trans-disciplinary “tools for thinking” that we argue are key to creativity. These skills encapsulate the ways in which creative people, across disciplines, think. Our previous articles have looked at Perceiving, and Patterning. This one focuses on Abstracting. Future pieces will look at Embodied Thinking, Modeling, Play, and Synthesizing. Below is a link to the latest article (you can see all the articles in the series by going here.

Henriksen, D., Fahnoe, C., & Mishra, P. & the Deep-Play Research Group (in press). Abstracting as a trans-disciplinary habit of mind. Tech Trends (58)6. p. 3-7


Photo: Graffiti in Valpariso, Chile, October 2014.

International Coffee Day (new ambigram)

September 30, 2014 § 1 Comment

Yesterday was International Coffee Day. In celebration (one day late but hey… ) here is a new ambigram for coffee. Enjoy.

   

Internet

   


Rotate

21st century learning, TPACK and other fun stuff

September 29, 2014 § Leave a Comment

title

I have been invited to participate in the 2014 Educational Technology Summit: Empowering Educators to Enhance Student Learning in the Digital Era. This conference is being organized by Common Sense MediaAnnenberg Retreat at Sunnylands, & the LEAD Commission. I am serving on a panel on preparing new teachers, moderated by Ruth Marcus of the Washington Post. Other members on the panel are Daniel Soodjinda, Ed.D., from the California State University Stanislaus, and Deborah Stipek, dean, Stanford Graduate School of Education. It is going to be a packed and exciting day (see the schedule for yourself and if you are so inclined, you can actually watch the proceedings streamed live).

logos

On this page I just wanted to list some resources that I think will come up during our discussion (that’s me being proactive, you see).  « Read the rest of this entry »

TPACK Newsletter #21: September 2014

September 24, 2014 § Leave a Comment

TPACK BUTTON

TPACK Newsletter, Issue #21 (September, 2014)

Welcome to the twenty-first edition of the (approximately bimonthly) TPACK Newsletter! TPACK work is continuing worldwide. This document contains recent updates to that work that we hope will be interesting and useful to you, our subscribers.

If you are not sure what TPACK is, please surf over to http://www.tpack.org/ to find out more.

Gratuitous Quote About Technology

The one exclusive sign of thorough knowledge is the power of teaching—Aristotle

In This Issue

-1. Gratuitous Quote About Technology
0. In This Issue (You are here.)
1. TPACK Newsletter Update
2. Recent TPACK Publications
3. Recent TPACK-Related Dissertations
4. Recent TPACK Presentations
5. Recent TPACK-Related Blog Entries
6. TPACK Newsletter Suggested Citation
7. Learning and Doing More with TPACK
–. Un-numbered miscellaneous stuff at the end

« Read the rest of this entry »

A decade of running, some thanks

September 22, 2014 § 5 Comments

IMG_1411

Ten years ago I participated in my first formal race. It was the 2004 Capital City River Run and back then it was a 10 mile run. Today (September 20, 2014), I ran my 11th race, the 2014 Capital City River Run – now a half marathon.

It has been a decade of running.

In this decade (technically a decade plus 1) I have run 11 races, averaging one per year – 3 ten-mile races and 8 half-marathons. Not bad for a person who does not consider himself a runner. The photo above is all the participation medals I have collected!

Running does not come easy to me and moreover I am not very good at it. And nor do I take it seriously, as evidenced by my idiosyncratic training schedule, where where family, work and travel (and pretty much everything else) take priority over running.

But over the past decade (plus 1) I have done one thing. I have signed up for the Capital City River Run and I participate. The goal have never been to win medals (not that I was ever in contention for any) and oftentimes the goal is not even to get a PR. The goal is to show up at the start, keep running till I finish.

Clearly despite my lack of talent and seriousness I did manage to run these 11 races. It is important for me to acknowledge the fact that this would not have been possible without a few key individuals, and that these people deserve my thanks, and this, 10 years into the process, is as good a time as any to do so.

« Read the rest of this entry »

The blame (& praise) game continues

September 18, 2014 § 1 Comment

I have shared earlier a design for a reflection ambigram for the two words “praise” and “blame” – where one word becomes another when reflected in a mirror. In fact the design has been printed in 3D. As it turns out this was a design that I had made many years ago – and was for the most part, I was satisfied with it. Yes the “s” was a bit iffy – but hey, it worked. Here is the old design:


Praise Blame


Reflect


But in the process of cleaning it up to give to Jon Good to print – I was more and more bothered by it, so I went back to the drawing board and came up with a new design. Overall the solution is the same – or at least shares the same skeletal structure – but the overall result is much better, and far more readable this time around. Enjoy.


blame-praise


Reflect


This is part of the reason I love creating ambigrams. Letterforms are subtle, nuanced and rich arenas of exploration, and they never cease to surprise me even today, after so many years of playing with them.

Praise-blame ambigram in 3D

September 17, 2014 § Leave a Comment


Jon Good has been playing around with some new 3D printers we just bought and this is what he printed for me – a 3-D version of the “praise-blame” ambigram (click here for the 2-D version). How cool is that!

So what you are seeing in the top half is the printed artifact and below it is its reflection. You can click the button below to animate the image…


Praise Blame


Reflect


Robert Frost writes a paper

September 16, 2014 § Leave a Comment

snow

First it was Lewis Carroll and Jabberwocky and now it is Robert Frost and his poem Stopping by the woods on a snowy evening that receives the EPET treatment. Here is poem #2 in our series of famous poems rewritten from a graduate school perspective.

Thanks to Diana Campbell for following up a brief conversation at a party with a great first draft. Danah Henriksen and I jumped in and put in our two cents as and when not needed. Without further ado, here is:  Stopping by the college on a snowy evening « Read the rest of this entry »

Ambigrams animated: 3 new designs

September 15, 2014 § Leave a Comment

I love creating ambigrams, words written in such a manner that they can be read from multiple perspective – rotated, reflected and so on. These designs are much easier to “grasp” when printed on paper since you can actually turn the paper around, hold it against a mirror or hold it against the light while looking at it from the other side. All that is harder to do on a webpage. So I have been thinking of ways of making the entire process a bit more interactive (sort of what John Langdon does so neatly on his site). So after poking around with css and javascript and WordPress I think I finally have a solution. So below are three designs (for the words “internet,” “Angel” and the word-pair “Praise-Blame” that you can actually rotate by 180 degrees and and reflect (in two different ways, along the x and y axes) to bring out the symmetry or the surprise inherent in the designs. Here they are below:

« Read the rest of this entry »

Jabberwocky goes to graduate school

September 9, 2014 § Leave a Comment

blabberjocky

The 5th floor of Erickson Hall is a fun place to be. Typically a bunch of graduate students hang out there, working on their readings, talking shop and in general having a good time. For some reason, last week, I promised Josh Rosenberg that I would write a poem for them. I don’t know why I promised this… I just did. So now that I had said it, it had to be done.

So I wrote a poem building from one my favorite poems of all time, Lewis Carroll’s Jabberwocky. It wasn’t the greatest thing but hey, whatever. I shared the draft with others and asked for suggestions to help make it better. And all hell broke loose. Suggestions came from left and right, via email and conversations in passing. And at each step the poem became richer, more consistent, better connected to the original…

So here is Blabberjocky, on the fifth… a poem that ended up becoming something greater than the sum of the individual contributions. A special shout out to Danah Henriksen, Spencer Greenhalgh, and Andrea Zellner for their help. Since the first version was prompted by an unsolicited promise made to Josh Rosenberg, it is clear that a large part of the blame for this poem being inflicted in the world lies with him.

Here it is:

« Read the rest of this entry »

International Literacy Day, new ambigram

September 8, 2014 § Leave a Comment

literacy-reading

In celebration of International Literacy Day, here is a new ambigram design – it reads, “Literacy” one way and “Reading” the other! Enjoy. See below for an attempt to use CSS to use to make the rotation automatic when you move your cursor over the image. Check it out. I think it is pretty cool.

 

 

reading

 

 

Happy Teacher’s Day (new ambigrams)

September 5, 2014 § Leave a Comment

September 5 is Teacher’s Day in India. It is celebrated on the birthdate of Sarvepalli Radhakrishnan, Indian philosopher and statesman who was also the first Vice-President and the second President of India. He famously said, “teachers should be the best minds in the country.” To celebrate this day, here are three new ambigram designs (see image below). The first, goes around the circle, reading “teacher” one way and “learner” the other way. You can read these words from left to right starting from the top OR the bottom. In the center are two new designs where the word “teacher” and “learner” map onto themselves (when rotated 180 degrees). Enjoy. (Note, you can click on the graphic to view a larger version).

And yes, Happy Teacher’s Day to all my educator friends!!! (Move your mouse over the image to rotate it!)

  

teacher-learner

  

There is no app for that

September 4, 2014 § Leave a Comment

noappforthat

Ideas.TED.com has a new article titled—There’s no app for good teaching: 8 ways to think about tech in ways that actually improve the classroom. It quotes a bunch of scholars and researchers, one of whom is yours truly. I am just posting this, for the record.

Image created by Punya Mishra, using https://imgflip.com/memegenerator

 

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