The tensions inherent in creativity: Interview with Mark Runco

August 2, 2016 § Leave a comment

navigating-tensions

The next article in our series (Rethinking technology and creativity for the 21st century) for the journal Tech Trends is now available online. This article has an interview with Dr. Mark Runco, Distinguished Research Fellow of the American Institute of Behavioral Research and Technology, a Professor at the University of Georgia, and an internationally recognized scholar of creativity. Read more by following the link below:

Richardson, C., Mishra, P., & the Deep-Play Research Group (2016). Navigating the Tensions Inherent in Understanding Creativity: An Interview with Mark RuncoTech Trends (60)5,

TPACK in Spanish

August 2, 2016 § Leave a comment

Back in 2013 we (Koehler, Mishra and Cain) published an updated version of an article on TPACK.

Koehler, M. J., Mishra, P., & Cain, W. (2013). What is Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge (TPACK)Journal of Education (193)3, 13-20.

This article was then picked up, translated into Spanish and published in the journal Virtualidad, Educación y Ciencia (Virtuality, Education and Science). Complete citation and link below:

Koehler, M.J., Mishra, P., & Cain, W. (2015). ¿Qué son los Saberes Tecnológicos y Pedagógicos del Contenido (TPACK)? Virtualidad, Educación y Ciencia, (6)10.

Alternatively  you can access is directly at https://revistas.unc.edu.ar/index.php/vesc/article/view/11552/11983

Why teachers should care about beauty in science

August 2, 2016 § Leave a comment

illustration1-smallFigure 1. “We are a way for the universe to know itself” – Carl Sagan
Science is one of the most powerful ways to engage with the beauty of the universe.
We use science to understand the cosmos and, in the process,
find beauty in our understandings and representations of it. 

•  •  •

iWonder: Rediscovering School Science is a new journal of science education focusing on middle school science teachers, published by the Azim Premji University. The second issue of the journal just appeared – and it has the first article in a series titled Research to Practice, that I am co-editing with my colleague Angie Calabrese Barton. Written by Rohit Mehta and Sarah Keenan, you can find the article, complete citation and abstract below:

Mehta, R., & Keenan, S. (2016, June). Why teachers should care about beauty in science education. iWonder: Rediscovering School Science (1) 2, 83-86.

Abstract: This article explores the role of beauty in science education. The authors use research in science education to highlight the importance of teachers consciously making connections to aesthetic aspects in science. Caring about beauty in science can inspire a sense of wonder and curiosity among students.

Incidentally, one of the most fun parts of writing this article was having to create the illustrations that accompany the prose. Both these images were created with resources shared freely under Creative Commons licenses, and labeled for reuse with modification. The first illustration is given above (at the beginning of the blog post) and the second one is below.

illustration2-small

Figure 2.Connecting across scales of beauty.
From the grandeur of the cosmos to the intricacies of sub-atomic particles,
beauty is all around us. These infinities (of the very small and the very large)
are bridged by the human intellect—the beauty of mathematics at work.

Infusing creativity & technology in education (new publication)

August 2, 2016 § Leave a comment

csik-diag

Danah Henriksen, Petra Fisser and I have a new article (complete reference and link below). This article emerged from a Thematic Working group on Creativity in a technology enhanced curriculum that the three of us led at EduSummIT 2015 (see more here). This article is part of a special issue of the Journal of Educational Technology and Society devoted to EdusummIT 2015. You can download the entire issue here or just our article below:

Henriksen, D., Mishra, P., & Fisser, P. (2016). Infusing Creativity and Technology in 21st Century Education: A Systemic View for Change. Educational Technology & Society, 19 (3), 27–37.

Abstract: In this article, we explore creativity alongside educational technology, as fundamental constructs of 21st century education. Creativity has becoming increasingly important, as one of the most important and noted skills for success in the 21st century. We offer a definition of creativity; and draw upon a systems model of creativity, to suggest creativity emerges and exists within a system, rather than only at the level of individual processes. We suggest that effective infusion of creativity and technology in education must be considered in a three-fold systemic manner: at the levels of teacher education, assessment and educational policy. We provide research and practical implications with broad recommendations across these three areas, to build discourse around infusion of creative thinking and technology in 21st century educational systems.

Illustration credit: Individual – Field – Domain and their interactions to determine Where is Creativity? (Illustration by Punya Mishra, based on Csikszentmihalyi, 1997)

Good teaching is good design

June 27, 2016 § 2 Comments

lessbutbetter-dieterrams

I just came across Dieter Rams: ten principles for good design and was immediately struck by how closely they paralleled what is essential for good teaching. All one has to do is replace the word “design” with “teaching” and I think we get 10 pretty good principles to follow (or think about). This is a game I have played before in this post about the need for new educational research paradigms / approaches building on some comments by Don Norman about the need to new design research paradigms / approaches (see Rethinking Ed Tech Research).

Here are Rams’ 10 principles with the word design replaced by teaching (and in a couple of cases lightly edited to make sense in this new context).

  1. Good teaching is innovative
  2. Good teaching is useful
  3. Good teaching is aesthetic
  4. Good teaching is understandable
  5. Good teaching is unobtrusive
  6. Good teaching is honest
  7. Good teaching is long-lasting
  8. Good teaching is thorough down to the last detail
  9. Good teaching is environmentally friendly
  10. Good teaching is as little teaching as possible.

He is also known for saying “Less but better” which, if you ask me, is a good slogan for teaching as well.

Hot of the press: eBook on Creativity, Technology & Teacher Education

June 10, 2016 § 2 Comments

Creativity-Tech-TE-book-cover

Danah Henriksen and I recently edited a special issue of the Journal of Technology and Teacher Education (Volume 23, Number 3, July 2015) devoted to Creativity, Technology and Teacher Education (see blog post here). This special issue has now been issued as an eBook by AACE. Here is the complete citation, along with links to the book page on LearnTechLib and the complete pdf, as well as an abstract:

Henriksen, D., & Mishra, P. (2016). Creativity, technology & teacher education. Waynesville, NC: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). [LearnTechLib link | Link to complete eBook PDF]

Abstract: This book focuses on research related to creativity, technology and teacher education, examining these topics through a range of approaches and ideas across multiple contexts. The volume itself began as a special issue of the Journal of Technology & Teacher Education. The chapters in this book speak to different aspects of theory, research, and practice – in attempts to go beyond the specifics or intricacies of tools, and towards a broader framework. This provides guiding ideas and takeaways that can inform the future of teacher education. One of the strengths of this volume is the rich manner in which these ideas are explored across different subject matters, classroom and learning contexts, technologies, teacher roles, pedagogical approaches, and theoretical frameworks.

Keywords and complete table of contents, below the jump:

« Read the rest of this entry »

Handbook of TPACK for Educators, 2nd Edition

May 24, 2016 § Leave a comment

handbook2-cover

The TPACK framework, as we know it today, was first introduced to the world in 2006 in an article in TCRecord (Mishra & Koehler, 2006). An important part of the story of the success of the framework was the publication of The handbook of technological pedagogical content knowledge (TPCK) for educators by AACTE and Routledge. Matt and I wrote an introductory chapter for that (see Koehler & Mishra, 2008).

Over the past decade the amount of research into TPACK has grown exponentially… and so it was time for the 2nd edition of the handbook (citation and more information below).

« Read the rest of this entry »

Rich TPACK Cases: Great Resource Book

May 24, 2016 § Leave a comment

tpack-practitionersguide-cover

The TPACK framework is a theoretical framework that seeks to influence practice. And most gratifyingly (for Matt Koehler and myself) it appears to have had a significant impact in that area. That said, the field lacked concrete, rich examples of TPACK in practice. Cases that would (quoting Darling-Hammond & Snyder) “add context to theory” highlighting the rich telling detail, as well as local contextual factors that are often lost when teaching is discussed in more general terms.

This gap has now been filled with a lovely ebook by my friends and colleagues Mark Hofer, Lynn Bell and Glen Bull. The Practitioner’s guide to technology pedagogy and content knowledge (TPACK): Rich media cases of teacher knowledge focuses on developing rich “exemplary” cases of practice, and boy does it deliver. Consider what is included in each of the cases included in the book:

« Read the rest of this entry »

Episteme6 @ Mumbai: 2 presentations

January 28, 2016 § Leave a comment

episteme6

This past December I was at the epiSTEME 6 conference in Mumbai. It was jointly  organized by the Homi Bhaba Center for Science Education, TIFR and the Interdisciplinary Program in Educational Technology, IIT Bombay. I presented two papers there, oneabout the work being done by the Deep-Play group in the area of aesthetics and learning in the STEM disciplines and the other on the work we are doing with MSUrbanSTEM in Chicago.

The slides and papers from the proceedings for both these talks can be found below…

« Read the rest of this entry »

Creativity in mathematics and beyond: New article

January 17, 2016 § 1 Comment

mathdance

Our series of articles related to the broad topic of Rethinking technology and creativity for the 21st century in the journal TechTrends continues with a new article on creativity in mathematics. This article focuses on the 4 winners of the 2014 Fields medal (one of the highest honors in mathematics and a recognition from one’s peers of highly influential and creative work).  Complete reference and link below:

Mehta, R., Mishra, P., & Henriksen, D., & the Deep-Play Research Group (2016). Creativity in mathematics and beyond — Learning from Fields medal winners. Tech Trends (59)7

E-Leadership & Teacher Development: New article

December 13, 2015 § Leave a comment

 

ict-book-cover

Mishra, P., Henriksen, D., Boltz, L. O., Richardson, C. (2015). E-Leadership and Teacher Development Using ICT. In R. Huang; Kinshuk; J. K. Price (Eds.). ICT in Education in Global Context: Comparative Reports of Innovations in K-12 Education. Berlin: Springer. pp. 249-266.

Abstract: In this chapter, we develop a definition of e-leadership that extends from the business sector to encompass educational contexts. We describe schools as complex ecologies and dynamic organizations that require a change in both traditional forms of leadership and more recent ICT use. We use the RAT (Replace, Amplify, Transform) framework to explain the varying degrees to which ICT has been used in business and education and relate this model to the research in e-leadership. It is through the purposeful, transformational use of ICT and the meaningful development of multiple kinds of knowledge that those in charge of teacher education and growth can use ICT to develop a new kind of teacher leader.

TPACK Newsletter #25, October 2015

November 17, 2015 § Leave a comment

TPACK BUTTON

TPACK Newsletter, Issue #25: October 2015 (Updated)

Welcome to the twenty-fifth edition of the (approximately bimonthly) TPACK Newsletter! TPACK work is continuing worldwide. This document contains recent updates to that work that we hope will be interesting and useful to you, our subscribers.

[Editors’ note: This document is an update to a previously distributed version of issue #25. Please delete the earlier document and accept our apologies for the second distribution.]

If you are not sure what TPACK is, please surf over to http://www.tpack.org/ to find out more.

Gratuitous Quote About Technology

“Technology is a word that describes something that doesn’t work yet.”
–Douglas Adams

In This Issue

-1. Gratuitous Quote About Technology
0. In This Issue (You are here.)
1. TPACK Newsletter Update
2. Recent TPACK Publications
3. Recent TPACK-Related Dissertations
4. Recent TPACK-Related Presentations
5. Request for TPACK-Related Research Participation
6. Call for TPACK-Related Manuscripts
7. TPACK Newsletter Suggested Citation
8. Learning and Doing More with TPACK
–. Un-numbered miscellaneous stuff at the end « Read the rest of this entry »

EduSummIT 2015: Summary Report

November 10, 2015 § Leave a comment

EDUsummIT 2015 (International Summit on ICT in Education) is a global knowledge building community of researchers, educational practitioners, and policy makers committed to supporting the effective integration of research and practice in the field of ICT in education. EDUsummIT 2015 was co-­hosted by UNESCO Bangkok and Curtin University, and sponsored by Blackboard. The theme of EDUsummIT 2015, Technology Advanced Quality Learning For All. Nine thematic working groups (TWG) were formed in the beginning of 2015. These groups included:

  • TWG1: Smart partnerships
  • TWG2: Advancing mobile learning in formal and informal settings
  • TWG3: Professional development for policy makers, school leaders and teachers
  • TWG4: Addressing gaps and promoting educational equity
  • TWG5: Assessment as, for, and of learning in the 21st century
  • TWG6: Creativity in a technology enhanced curriculum
  • TWG7: Indicators of quality technology-­enhanced teaching and learning
  • TWG8: Digital citizenship and cyberwellness
  • TWG9: Curriculum -­advancing understanding of the roles of CS/Informatics in the curriculum

In the following TWG reports, each group has summarized the background and context of its theme of study, the issues and challenges, recommendations they proposed to researchers, policy makers and educational practitioners, and the action plan to move forward. <This blog post is a lightly edited version from the introduction by Kwok?Wing Lai, University of Otago College of Education, New Zealand>.  Enjoy.

Does the Internet mean that knowledge is obsolete? Quoted in Wired story

November 5, 2015 § Leave a comment

wired

I was recently interviewed by Wired magazine for a story about Sugata Mitra’s (of Hole in the Wall fame) experiments with minimally invasive learning, or more recently what are called SOLE (Self Organized Learning Environment) classrooms / schools. I have been skeptical of the Hole in the Wall work and though there is much I agree with the SOLE concept (focus on big open-ended questions, student autonomy etc.) there is also a lot I disagree with. More specifically, in my interview I took exception to the idea that in todays classroom’s and with the availability of the internet, “knowledge is obsolete.” To be honest that is a really dumb idea—to think that knowledge is merely looking up and connecting facts together without broader theoretical frameworks and without serious intellectual work. Some of what I talked about with the author of the piece (and it was a great conversation where we covered a lot of ground) ended up in the article. There is so much more to say or write about this but for now you can read the entire article and what I had to say about that idea by going here: In this classroom, knowledge is overrated

Enjoy.

Empathy through gaming: New article

November 2, 2015 § Leave a comment

empathy1

Over the past couple of years my research team (the Deep-Play Research group) and I have been writing an on-going series of articles  around the broad topic of Rethinking technology and creativity for the 21st century. Published in the journal TechTrends, these articles have been great fun to write, providing us the freedom to think deeply about these issues and, most importantly, put our ideas in words, and share them with the wider world. The latest article just came out. Complete reference and link below:

Boltz, L. O., Henriksen, D., Mishra, P., & the Deep-Play Research Group (2015). Empathy through gaming—Perspective taking in a complex worldTechTrends (59) , p. 3-8.

empathy_design (1)

 

Ed Psych in a digitally networked world: APA handbook chapter

August 25, 2015 § Leave a comment

edpsyFigure/Ground ambigram for
Educational Psychology by Punya Mishra

It has been a while coming, but finally the 3rd Edition of the Handbook of Educational Psychology is finally here. We have a chapter in it about the manner in which digital and networking technologies are changing the work that educational psychologists do. Reference and link below. Enjoy.

Mishra, P., Koehler, M. J., & Greenhow, C. (2015). The work of educational psychologists in a digitally networked world. In L. Corno & E. M. Anderman (Eds.) Handbook of Educational Psychology (3rd edition). (pp. 29-40). New York: Routledge.

Synthesis: A creative cognitive tool (2 articles)

August 25, 2015 § Leave a comment

Over the past couple of years my research team (the Deep-Play Research group) and I have been writing an on-going series of articles  about rethinking technology and creativity for the 21st century. Published in the journal TechTrends, these articles have been great fun to write, providing us the freedom to think deeply about these issues and, most importantly, put our ideas in words, and share them with the wider world. The last few have focused on transdisciplinary habits of mind that are essential for creativity. Our previous articles have looked at PerceivingPatterning, Abstracting, Modeling and Play. 

The next two articles (listed below) have focused on Synthesis. These two articles are co-authored with different colleagues, but manage to provide complementary visions of the idea. Here are the two latest articles (a complete list can be found here):

  1. Henrkisen, D., DeSchryver, M., Mishra, P. & the Deep-Play Research Group (in press). Transform and transcend: Synthesis as a trans-disciplinary approach to thinking and learningTech Trends (59)4.
  2. Lee, J., Hicks, D., Henriksen, D., & Mishra, P. (2015). Historical soundscapes for creative synthesis. Tech Trends (59)5. 4-8.

Creativity, Digitality, and Teacher Professional Development

August 24, 2015 § Leave a comment

te-digital-age

It has been almost 5 years since my research interests shifted formally to issues related to creativity, technology and teacher education. This line of work (though less influential than my TPACK related work) has led to multiple journal articles and research studies. It is influenced the classes I teach and in turn my pedagogical experiences have influenced my thinking and writing. Recently Maggie Niess and Henry Gillow-Wiles provided us (my research team The Deep-Play Research group) an opportunity to look back on this line of work and write it up for the Handbook of Research on Teacher Education in the Digital Age. Details, abstract and link to article provided below:

Mishra, P., Henriksen, D. & Mehta, R. (2015). Creativity, Digitality, and Teacher Professional Development: Unifying Theory, Research, and Practice. In  In M. Niess, & H. Gillow-Wiles (Eds.) Handbook of Research on Teacher Education in the Digital Age (pp. 691-722). Hershey, PA: Information Science Reference. [Download the article as a PDF]

Abstract« Read the rest of this entry »

Creativity, Technology & Teacher Education: JTATE Special Issue

August 24, 2015 § Leave a comment

grumpy-cat

Danah Henriksen and I recently edited a special issue of the Journal of Technology and Teacher Education (Volume 23, Number 3, July 2015) devoted to Creativity, Technology and Teacher Education.  This special issue is organized thematically around eight articles that explore these ideas from a rich range of perspectives. As we write in the introduction:

All in all the articles in this special issue speak to different aspects of theory, research, and practice – in attempts to go beyond the specifics or intricacies of tools, and towards providing a broader framework, or guiding ideas and takeaways that can inform the future of teacher education. One of the strengths of this special issue is the rich manner in which these key ideas are explored across different subject matters, classroom and learning contexts, technologies, teacher roles, pedagogical approaches, and theoretical frameworks… We believe that this special issue will be an important step toward exploring the connections between creativity, technology and teaching…

Below is a list of all the articles in the special issue, with links to the two articles we co-authored.  « Read the rest of this entry »

TPACK Newsletter #24, August 2015

August 24, 2015 § Leave a comment

TPACK BUTTON

TPACK Newsletter, Issue #24: August 2015

Welcome to the twenty-fourth edition of the (approximately bimonthly) TPACK Newsletter! TPACK work is continuing worldwide. This document contains recent updates to that work that we hope will be interesting and useful to you, our subscribers.

If you are not sure what TPACK is, please surf over to http://www.tpack.org/ to find out more.

Gratuitous Quote About Knowledge

“The best advice I ever got was that knowledge is power and to keep reading.” – David Bailey

In This Issue

-1. Gratuitous Quote About Knowledge
0. In This Issue (You are here.)
1. TPACK Newsletter Update
2. Recent TPACK Publications
3. Recent TPACK-Related Dissertations and Theses
4. Recent TPACK Presentations
5. Call for TPACK-related Award Nominations
6. TPACK Newsletter Suggested Citation
7. Learning and Doing More with TPACK
–. Un-numbered miscellaneous stuff at the end « Read the rest of this entry »

TPACK in Science: New book & chapter

June 22, 2015 § Leave a comment

scienctpackbook

I was invited to write an epilogue for a new book on the development of science teachers TPACK (with a specific focus on East Asia), and I “volunteered” my colleague Danah Henriksen to help with it (thanks Danah). The book was recently published. Here is the citation of our chapter (a pdf link to the chapter and a link to the book on the publishers website) as well as a description (below the break).

Mishra, P., Henriksen, D. (2015). The end of the beginning: An epilogue. In Ying Shao Hsu. Development of Science Teachers’ TPACK. East Asian Practices. Springer. p. 133-142.

« Read the rest of this entry »

Article in WEF Global Information Technology Report

April 22, 2015 § Leave a comment

WEF-meme

Everybody has heard of the  World Economic Forum (WEF) annual meeting in Davos, Switzerland. As Wikipedia says, “The meeting brings together some 2,500 top business leaders, international political leaders, selected intellectuals, and journalists to discuss the most pressing issues facing the world, including health and the environment.” The WEF is more than the Davos meeting, however. It is an “independent international organization committed to improving the state of the world by engaging business, political, academic, and other leaders of society to shape global, regional, and industry agendas.” Website at http://www.weforum.org/

The WEF recently came out with the Global Information Technology Report 2015. The theme this year was ICT for Inclusive Growth. I was invited to write a chapter in the report by Anurag Behar, vice-chancellor of the Azim Premji University and co-CEO of the Azim Premji Foundation. You can access the complete report by clicking the link above or read the PDF of our chapter by clicking on the title below.

Behar, A., & Mishra, P. (2015). ICTs in Schools: Why focusing policy and resources on educators, not children, will improve educational outcomes. In ICT for Inclusive Growth: Global Information Technology Report 2015. World Economic Forum.

Sadly this doesn’t mean that I am headed to Davos anytime soon… but it is good to have our ideas out there, hopefully to be read by “business, political, academic, and other leaders of society” and through that, hopefully help “shape global, regional, and industry agendas.”

Interview in Educational Technology Journal

April 21, 2015 § Leave a comment

interview-meme

I was recently interviewed by the journal Educational Technology: The magazine for managers of change in education as a part of their series Q & A with Ed Tech Leaders. The interviews are conducted by contributing editors, Susan M. Fulgham and Michael F. Shaughnessy. I would like the thank the two of them for their patience — since I was more than a little tardy in getting back to them. But they were always more than gracious and for that I am grateful.

You can download and read the entire interview here: Mishra Interview ET 2015.

I am also including the interview below in HTML format – since that lets me add links to resources, articles, and people, something I could not do in the published interview, sometimes in the form of parenthetical notes, often as in-text links. That said, if you have to quote from the interview please go with the published PDF above.

« Read the rest of this entry »

Poetry, Daisies And Cobras: Math Class With Manjul Bhargava

March 25, 2015 § 1 Comment

An amazing presentation by Manjul Bhargava (Fields medal winner in Mathematics) to school children in India. See how he effortlessly combines poetry, nature, music and mathematics.

Watch an excerpt on YouTube below or the complete video here.

YouTube Preview Image

 

 

Embodied Thinking: New article

January 11, 2015 § Leave a comment

sculpture-chilePhoto: Punya Mishra; Santiago, Chile, 2014

Rethinking Technology & Creativity in the 21st Century is a series of articles we have been writing for Tech Trends. The latest article in the series has just ben published. This article focuses on Embodied Thinking as a key trans-disciplinary habit of mind often used by creative people across disciplines. Our previous articles have looked at PerceivingPatterning, and Abstracting. Future pieces will look at Modeling, Play, and Synthesizing. Below is a link to the latest article (you can see all the articles in the series by going here).

Henriksen, D., Good, J., & Mishra, P. & the Deep-Play Research Group (in press). Embodied Thinking as a trans-disciplinary habit of mind. Tech Trends (58)6. p. 3-7

Inside-Out: Happy 2015

December 27, 2014 § 1 Comment

Every winter break (for the past six years) our family creates a video to welcome the new year. This is no ordinary video. It requires days of discussion, planning, construction, shooting, and editing.

Our videos never feature us (expect maybe a still-shot of the entire family towards the end) but are usually typographical in nature. There is some kind of visual illusion involved, sometimes a play on words synchronized to music. The videos have become more elaborate over the years and the challenge, of course, is to create something that tops what we had done in the past years. As you can imagine this has become more and more difficult as the years go by. What makes things more complicated is that we have no budget to speak of ($10 is around as much as we have ever spent in any given year). If you want to see all the videos in the series, or find out more about how this year’s video was created, scroll down to the end of this post.

Working on these videos has led to is some great family moments, as we argue, discuss, collaborate and create. Below is our latest video, titled Inside-Out: Happy 2015. Raise the volume of your device to max, click to make the video full-screen and hit play! Enjoy.

Inside-Out: Happy 2015
From Shreya, Soham, Smita & Punya

*****

Videos from years past

Here are links to the videos from the previous years (along with some other videos made as a family):

*****

The making of Inside-Out: 

The idea for the video came from examples such as this one on Youtube – with some creative improvisation by us. Essentially what you have here are not cubes but shells of cubes. The inner shell, the concave end (imagine the inner corner of a room) has the numbers 2, 0, 1 and 4 written on them while the other side, the convex side, has the numbers 2, 0, 1 and 5 written on them. The letters were projected onto the cubes (using a computer and a projector) and written in such a way that they would be readable only when seen from ONE specific viewpoint. These “cubes” were then stuck onto wooden barbecue skewers that were held up by poking them into little boxes of playdoh. All four of these were then placed on a wooden board placed on a standard Lazy Susan (nabbed from the kitchen) which allowed them to be rotated at will. All this was placed in front of our living-room TV (covered with black sheets). After some experimentation with the lighting we had our final setup.

When seen with one eye (or through a camera), even the inside of a cube looks like a cube (due to the lack of depth perception). What this meant is that when you see the “cubes” for the first time you are not actually seeing cubes but rather the concave shell of a cube. Our eyes however, see a cube and when tilted or rotated slightly they appear to move in strange counter-intuitive ways. A full rotation leads you to seeing the convex end (with the numbers 2015). The setup was filmed using a Nikon D7000 camera and edited on iMovie. Music was provided by the amazing collection of free music provided by Kevin McLeod (at Incompetech.com). Below is a photo of the setup

IMG_2008

 

New webinar on TPACK

November 1, 2014 § 1 Comment

webinar

Matt Koehler and I recently participated on a webinar titled Teachers as Designers of Technology, Pedagogy, and Content (TPACK) organized by edWeb.net and Commonsense Education. We had over 200+ viewers from all over the world (New Zeeland, Israel, Morroco, Canada being some of the countries represented). The webinar was quite fun and you can view it in its entirety here

Help with research (max 10 mins). Please share

October 23, 2014 § Leave a comment

survey-meme

This is a request for help. If you are an educator (K12 teacher or administrator, higher ed faculty, corporate trainer etc.) we would like approximately 10 minutes of your time to complete a survey regarding the challenges faced by educators in the 21st century and the kinds of knowledge and/or skills needed to face these challenges. The survey should not take more than 8-12 minutes of your time to complete. Your responses will be confidential and fully anonymous. Your participation is voluntary, though we sincerely hope you will respond. Click on the link below to access the survey.

http://tiny.cc/teach21st/

Also, we would appreciate your forwarding this message to others. Here is a handy tweet you can copy and paste on to your twitter feed or Facebook post if you like

Please complete this survey on 21st century learning http://tiny.cc/teach21st/ Thank you @punyamishra

Thank you very much for considering this request and please contact me punya@msu.edu if you have any questions.

21st century learning, TPACK and other fun stuff

September 29, 2014 § Leave a comment

title

I have been invited to participate in the 2014 Educational Technology Summit: Empowering Educators to Enhance Student Learning in the Digital Era. This conference is being organized by Common Sense MediaAnnenberg Retreat at Sunnylands, & the LEAD Commission. I am serving on a panel on preparing new teachers, moderated by Ruth Marcus of the Washington Post. Other members on the panel are Daniel Soodjinda, Ed.D., from the California State University Stanislaus, and Deborah Stipek, dean, Stanford Graduate School of Education. It is going to be a packed and exciting day (see the schedule for yourself and if you are so inclined, you can actually watch the proceedings streamed live).

logos

On this page I just wanted to list some resources that I think will come up during our discussion (that’s me being proactive, you see).  « Read the rest of this entry »

Happy Teacher’s Day (new ambigrams)

September 5, 2014 § Leave a comment

September 5 is Teacher’s Day in India. It is celebrated on the birthdate of Sarvepalli Radhakrishnan, Indian philosopher and statesman who was also the first Vice-President and the second President of India. He famously said, “teachers should be the best minds in the country.” To celebrate this day, here are three new ambigram designs (see image below). The first, goes around the circle, reading “teacher” one way and “learner” the other way. You can read these words from left to right starting from the top OR the bottom. In the center are two new designs where the word “teacher” and “learner” map onto themselves (when rotated 180 degrees). Enjoy. (Note, you can click on the graphic to view a larger version).

And yes, Happy Teacher’s Day to all my educator friends!!! (Move your mouse over the image to rotate it!)

  

teacher-learner

  

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