Creativity in the lives of accomplished teachers: Pre-pub version

March 28, 2014 § Leave a Comment

creativity.001How do exemplary teachers incorporate creativity in their teaching? In this dissertation study, Danah Henriksen  interviewed National Teacher of the Year award winners (and finalists), to better understand their beliefs, interests, and practices involving creative teaching. Analysis of the data help us identify key themes of how these teachers approach the creative process, as well as the connection between their personal interests and professional creativity.

This paper has been accepted for publication in Teachers College Record. The link below is to a pre-publication version, so please contact us if you would like to quote from it or cite it.

Title

Henriksen, D., & Mishra, P. (in press). We teach who we are: Creativity in the lives and practices of accomplished teachers. Teachers College Press.

Extended Abstract

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What is the value of a theoretical framework?

March 25, 2014 § Leave a Comment

theory.001

One question that all doctoral students dread (and rightfully so) is “What is your theoretical framework?” Why, they wonder (silently), why do we need a framework?

This question popped up recently in, of all places, Facebook. Pilar Quezzaire, a graduate of our MAET program, posted a question to our overseas FB page as follows:

Busy writing away about technology integration frameworks like TPACK, and I’ve been asked to come up with a few definitive articles about their effectiveness in general (not the effectiveness of a particular framework.) Has anyone come across a source that looks at the difference between integrating tech with a framework in mind, versus integrating technology without one? … I can (cite/list) lots of articles and case studies, but no one seems to have looked at the trend of using frameworks. Thanks!

This was not something I had given much thought to before. Theory is sacrosanct in academia, its the air we breathe so why question it. Reflecting on Pilar’s question prompted me to respond at length (maybe at greater length than she needed or wanted). Interestingly, the discussion moved form citing specific studies into the deeper philosophy of science issues. This is what I wrote (edited lightly to make it work as a blog post):

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EPET at SITE, 2014

March 3, 2014 § 1 Comment

SITE2014 (the annual conference of the Society of Information Technology in Teacher Education) is being held in Jacksonville, Florida starting the 17th of March. As always, the Educational Psychology and Educational Technology program at MSU has a significant presence at the conference. This includes presentations and symposia organized by faculty, graduate students and graduates of our program. Thanks to Rohit Mehta, we now have a list of all the various events EPET people are involved in. Here it is, arranged chronologically:

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21st century learning article receives ISTE award

February 19, 2014 § 2 Comments

21stcenturylearning-synthesis-color

Back in July 2013, the Journal of Digital Learning in Teacher Education (JDLTE) published our paper on 21st Century Learning. This paper written with Kristen Kereluik, Chris Fahnoe and Laura Terry looked at over a dozen different 21st century learning frameworks and attempted to come up with a coherent overarching framework—and its implications for teacher education. I have received occasional emails from people who have stumbled on this article and have liked it. What has been gratifying is that most of these messages are from practitioners! And then… yesterday, we received an email, as follows:

This year marks the beginning of an annual recognition for researchers who have published in the Journal of Digital Learning in Teacher Education—the JDLTE Outstanding Research Paper award. This award is in recognition of the single article from the prior volume year with the highest possibility to advance the field of teacher education, based on the criteria of potential impact and contribution, innovativeness, and generalizability or usability.
As Chair of the JDLTE Outstanding Research Article Award Committee, along with the editors of JDLTE, I am pleased to let you know that your article, “What Knowledge is of Most Worth: Teacher Knowledge for 21st Century Learning, by Kristen Kereluik, Punya Mishra, Chris Fahnoe, and Laura Terry, has won this prestigious honor.
We would like to recognize your work during the ISTE conference this summer, and invite you to present your study during a full one-hour session that has been set aside for this purpose.
 How cool is that!!

Here is the full reference with a link to the article.

Kereluik, K., Mishra, P., Fahnoe, C., & Terry, L. (2013). What knowledge is of most worth: Teacher knowledge for 21st century learningJournal of Digital Learning in Teacher Education, 29(4), 127-140.

Also the diagram synthesizing our findings can be found here: http://punya.educ.msu.edu/2013/05/10/2-diagrams-21st-century-knowledge-synthesized-7-trans-disciplinary-skills/

 

Research to practice : 3 articles

February 3, 2014 § Leave a Comment

r2p
Matt Koehler and I are co-editors for an ongoing series of articles “From Research to Practice” for Education Matters, an educational magazine published by Educational Technology & Management Academy (ETMA). ETMA is non-profit organization based in New Delhi dedicated to pioneering innovations through research and development. Three of these articles are now available online. I had posted about the first a while ago and as I wrote then, this series has been great fun to write, allow us to work closely with graduate students in writing for a popular audience. I am quite proud of how our students have managed to take complex research and present it in a manner that is simple and accessible, but never simplistic.
etma-banner

What is TPACK? Updated article

January 22, 2014 § Leave a Comment

Infinite Mirror(?) | Josh Otis | Flickr

There are some articles that sink without a trace. There are others like our 2006 TCRecord article introducing the TPACK framework that continues to be cited… and then there are some that keep getting published over and over (albeit in an updated manner). Here is one of them… the gift that keeps on giving!

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TPACK Newsletter, Issue #18, December 2013

December 14, 2013 § Leave a Comment

TPACK BUTTON

TPACK Newsletter, Issue #18: December 2013

Welcome to the eighteenth edition of the (approximately bimonthly) TPACK Newsletter! TPACK work is continuing worldwide. This document contains recent updates to that work that we hope will be interesting and useful to you, our subscribers. If you are not sure what TPACK is, please surf over to http://www.tpack.org/ to find out more.

Gratuitous Quote About Technology
“The good part about writing about technology is that you never run out of ideas, because it’s changing so fast. The bad part is that it’s changing so fast that there’s a million new products and ideas every day and every week.”- Walt Mossberg

In This Issue
-1.      Gratuitous Quote About Technology
0.      In This Issue                     (You are here.)
1.      TPACK Newsletter Update
2.      Recent TPACK Publications
3.      Recent TPACK-Related Dissertations & Theses
4.      Recent & Upcoming TPACK Presentations
5.      Recent TPACK-Related Blog Entries
6.      Other TPACK Updates
7.      TPACK Newsletter Suggested Citation
8.      Learning and Doing More with TPACK
–.       Un-numbered miscellaneous stuff at the end

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Of garbage cans and psychological media: Remembering Clifford Nass

November 5, 2013 § Leave a Comment

This has been a day of sad news from Stanford University. I blogged about the passing away of Dr. Nalini Ambady (see blog post here). I will digress a bit before I describe the second piece of news because the connection to me (and my work) is much more salient.

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Creativity, Technology & Teacher Education, Call for papers

November 1, 2013 § 12 Comments

We (Punya Mishra and Danah Henriksen, faculty at Michigan State University) are currently planning a special issue for the Journal of Teacher Education and Technology, on the topic of creativity. At the moment, we are looking for brief abstract submissions from educational scholars/authors, who may be interested in eventually submitting a full length piece on creativity (in the context of technology and teacher education). See below for a formal call for papers (with the brief abstract due at the beginning of December).

Drop us a line if you want to know more or forward this link to anybody who you think may be interested. Your help would be greatly appreciated.

Sincerely

~ Punya Mishra and Danah Henriksen (editors)

CALL FOR PAPERS: Special issue on Creativity, Technology & Teacher Education

21st Century Competencies, what are they? New article

September 10, 2013 § 1 Comment

Back in June 2011 I was in Paris for EduSummITBuilding a Global Community of Policy-Makers, Educators, and Researchers to Move Education into the Digital Age. EduSummIT was organized by UNESCO (along with other partners) and brought together over 120 scholars, policy makers from over 40 countries. I was part of a Thematic Focus Group emphasizing 21st century learning. It took two years but finally a special issue of the Journal of Computer Assisted Learning is out with 8 articles all emerging from the conference. Click here for the table of contents.

I am co-author on one article along with Joke Voogt from the University of Twente, Ola Erstad from University of Oslo, and Chris Dede from Harvard. Our article focuses on 21st Century competencies that are needed to be able to live in and contribute to our current (and future) society. A complete reference, abstract and a link to the pdf is given below:

Voogt, J., Erstad, O., Dede, C., & Mishra, P. (2013). Challenges to learning and schooling in the digital networked world of the 21st centuryJournal of Computer Assisted Learning29(5), 403–413. « Read the rest of this entry »

Seeing mathematics everywhere…

September 7, 2013 § 2 Comments

ollernshawDame Kathleen Ollernshaw was deaf since the age of 8. Despite this she had an amazing life as a mathematician, amateur astronomer, politician (she served as mayor of Manchester as well as in the Thatcher administration) and mother. To learn more about her read this story on the Scientific American website, titled Centenarian Dame Kathleen Ollerenshaw—Conqueror of Magic Squares, Rubik’s Cube and Mauna Kea. People with diverse interests like this always fascinate me (maybe it is because I am that way as well – though clearly not at the level of Dame Ollernshaw). You should read the article in full but I am highlighting some quotes that stood out for me. « Read the rest of this entry »

A NEW definition of creativity: Next article in series

August 27, 2013 § 1 Comment

Creativity AmbigramThe latest in our series Rethinking Technology and Creativity in the 21st Century is now available. The article was co-authored with Danah Henriksen (and the Deep-Play Research Group) and it titled: A NEW approach to defining and measuring creativity. In this article we seek to provide a definition of creativity, and in turn offer an example of an ongoing research project in which this definition is being used to develop rubrics for evaluating the products of the creative process. Here is a link to the full article

Mishra, P., Henriksen, D., & the Deep-Play Research Group (2013). A NEW approach to defining and measuring creativity. Tech Trends (57) 5, p. 5-13. 

Here is a key quote from the article: « Read the rest of this entry »

White paper on TPACK

August 24, 2013 § 1 Comment

cemca

The Commonwealth Educational Media Center for Asia (CEMCA) recently published a report on ICT Integrated Teacher Education Models. One of the pieces in the report was by us. Here it is below: « Read the rest of this entry »

The search for pattern, beauty & intelligent life…

August 22, 2013 § 1 Comment

Connecting birds nests to “crop circles under the ocean” leading to some thoughts on perception, beauty and finding intelligent life in the universe (or maybe even on this planet).

The other day I found a bird’s nest on my front lawn. Most probably it had fallen down from the tree above. Here it is. It is a tiny thing. One regular egg would fit snugly in it.

nest « Read the rest of this entry »

Speaking of leadership

August 9, 2013 § 1 Comment

Matt and I were invited to Sydney, Australia a year ago as a part of the Teaching Teachers for the Future (TTF) project. You can see a report in the New Educator: TPACK takes hold in Australia. As a part of this visit we were interviewed to speak a bit about leadership. I just found the video online… so for the record, here it is. Enjoy (or not).

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The TPACK framework in the Handbook of Ed Comm & Tech (4th Ed.)

August 8, 2013 § 2 Comments

Hot off the press: The Handbook of Research on Educational Communications and Technology, edited by Spector, Merrill, Elen & Bishop. And we have a chapter in it… Complete reference and abstract below: 

hrect « Read the rest of this entry »

Why don’t students like school… In 30 mins!

August 8, 2013 § 6 Comments

hateschool-calvin

One of the challenges faced by all instructors is ensuring that students actually read the textbook. This summer we came up with a innovative assignment to address this issue. The book in question was  Daniel Willingham’s Why Don’t Students Like School? A cognitive scientist answers questions about how the mind works and what it means for the classroom. 

We called it the 3 x 3 x 3 project since their task was to create a video overview for each of the chapters in the book under the following guidelines:  the video should be no more than 3 minutes long, it would provide 3 key ideas from the chapter and 3 practical implications of these ideas for educators and for teaching (hence 3 x 3 x 3!).

Beyond that we provided no constraints on the technology to be used, style to be followed. SInce we had 5 groups and the book has 9 chapters and a conclusion, each group got to create two of these short videos.

Here are the 10 videos the students created. In essence these 10 videos are a video summary of the book in 30 minutes! Enjoy.

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Design thinking, some resources

August 5, 2013 § Leave a Comment

I teaching CEP817, Learning Technology by Design in the spring semester. This is a course I love but it also one that needs to be redesigned. So I am always on the look-out for new resources that can help me rethink the class. I just came across the following website: Design Thinking Resources for Educators that seems to be just right for what I do (plan to do). So here it is… merely for archival purposes.

The joy of learning: Of fire and trees and Dr. Feynman

August 1, 2013 § 1 Comment

SylvaTree

Trees are some of the largest living things in the world. They can weigh tons. For instance the  One Oak Tree project measured and weighed a 222 year old Oak tree – and it’s weight was 14.4 Tonnes (3.86 tonnes of which was dry weight). That’s a lot of stuff! And this is not even an exceptional tree by any stretch of the imagination.

acorn_child_web

And imagine that all this stuff starts from a small oak seed! So where does all this bulk come from? « Read the rest of this entry »

Living words, MAET Summer 2013

July 31, 2013 § 1 Comment

Steven Jobs famously said,

Creativity is just connecting things. When you ask creative people how they did something, they feel a little guilty because they didn’t really do it, they just saw something. It seemed obvious to them after a while. That’s because they were able to connect experiences they’ve had and synthesize new things.

This summer the students and instructors of the East Lansing cohort of the MAET program created a short video around this quote.

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How not to conduct research

July 23, 2013 § Leave a Comment

Note: This post has been edited somewhat to (a) clearly hide the url, which I had not done a good job of before; and (b) to add a few suggestions in the last paragraph for some strategies to make it easier for the participants to take part in the study.  (September 18, 2013).

There are many pitfalls one can face while engaged in conducting research with humans. For instance, if you are designing a survey it is important to make it easy for participants to actually complete it. Matt Koehler pointed out to me one person who just got it totally wrong.

Here is a flyer, recruiting participants for a study on college students’ use of social media, that has been posted near the elevators here at Erickson Hall.

survey « Read the rest of this entry »

Teacher knowledge for 21st century learning: New article

July 5, 2013 § 6 Comments


21stcenturylearning-synthesis-color

This article has been a while coming… but our paper on an analysis of 21st century learning frameworks and implications for teacher knowledge is finally in print. A previous version of the paper can be found here. Here is the full reference with a link to the article. Citation and abstract appear below…

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Shape of the earth, top 10 reasons

June 21, 2013 § Leave a Comment

I have written previously about determining the shape of the earth… for instance, here is a post on seeing the shape of the earth using eclipses. (A somewhat similar effect could be seen in my photo of the moon during a lunar eclipse). On the web, I found another way of computing the shape of the earth through studying the turbulent wake of a ship. And then there was the post about reconciling the shape of the earth with the maps or projections we typically use (such as the mercator projection).

I was thus glad to find the following video:  Top 10 reasons why we know the Earth is round « Read the rest of this entry »

New ambigram: Motivation

June 4, 2013 § Leave a Comment

Just as the subject line says, new ambigram design this time for the word “motivation”

Trans-disciplinary creativity takes root (slowly)

May 30, 2013 § Leave a Comment

I wanted to bring attention to two articles that came across my desk today. The first was in the Chronicle of Higher Education titled Creativity: a Cure for the Common Curriculum on efforts at range of universities seeking “to train students in how innovative thinkers …[and] use the tools of creativity to solve problems.”

The second article in yesterday’s Washington Post was titled Engineering students learn how to swing dance during class to help with problem-solving skills.

I have been thinking and writing about this for a while now – and it is good to see some of these initiatives taking root. These are difficult issues to deal with mainly because the return on investment, as it were, for teaching creativity is hard to measure. But that just makes the task all the more interesting.

 

New edited series on Research to Practice

May 19, 2013 § 1 Comment

dodge

A few months ago I was invited (by the Educational Technology & Management Academy, an Indian educational organization) to write a series of short practitioner-oriented articles for a new educational e-magazine they were starting. The idea was to introduce to a wider audience of educators current research findings in the fields of educational psychology and educational technology research as well as their relevance to practice. « Read the rest of this entry »

2 diagrams: 21st century knowledge synthesized & 7 trans-disciplinary skills

May 10, 2013 § 3 Comments

As I go around presenting my work around 21st century learning I get requests for some of the visuals I show. In particular, I have been receiving requests for

  • Synthesis of 21st Century Knowledge
  • 7 trans-disciplinary skills for creativity in the 21st century

If you choose to use these diagrams in your work please credit it as follows: © Punya Mishra | punyamishra.com 2013

So for future convenience, here they are…

« Read the rest of this entry »

Cheating in a test, why that’s the way to go

April 26, 2013 § 1 Comment

I just read this wonderful essay by UCLA professor Peter Nonacs titled: Why I Let My Students Cheat On Their Game Theory Exam. In this essay he describes an experiment he recently conducted in his game theory class. This is what he told his students a week before the final exam for the class:

… I told my class that the Game Theory exam would be insanely hard—far harder than any that had established my rep as a hard prof. But as recompense, for this one time only, students could cheat. They could bring and use anything or anyone they liked, including animal behavior experts. (Richard Dawkins in town? Bring him!) They could surf the Web. They could talk to each other or call friends who’d taken the course before. They could offer me bribes. (I wouldn’t take them, but neither would I report it to the dean.) Only violations of state or federal criminal law such as kidnapping my dog, blackmail, or threats of violence were out of bounds.

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TPACK and new literacies

April 23, 2013 § 3 Comments

Over 150 years ago Herbert Spencer wrote an essay titled What Knowledge is of Most Worth in which he bemoaned the fact that most of the discussion around what is worth knowing in his day and age was based not on any rational discussion of the issues and the benefits and costs of learning one thing versus the other, but rather driven by instincts and “personal predilections.” It appears that we are at the same situation today as well – as we argue and attempt to define what we mean by 21st Century Learning.
The question raised by Spencer is the starting point of an article by my friend Hiller Spiers in which she (and her co-authors) seek to use Spencer’s question to frame a discussion around reading and the language arts (using the lens of the TPACK framework to do so). It is a chapter in a book edited by Young and Kajder (I had blogged about the book in a post titled: New TPACK themed book on English Education). Hiller has made her chapter available on the web, a full reference and link is provided below:

Spires, H., Hervey, L., & Watson, T. (2013). Scaffolding the TPACK framework in reading and language arts: New literacies, new minds. In C.A. Young & S. Kajder (Eds.), Research on technology in English education (pp. 33-61). Charlotte, NC: Information Age Publishing.

Measuring creativity, the sad news!

April 21, 2013 § 1 Comment

nocreativity

Chris Fahnoe, just sent me a link to a piece on KQED on measuring creativity. Nothing particularly new here but reading it sent me down a rabbit-hole of some quotes and ideas I had been wanting to blog about for a while. So here goes. All this started when I read a quote in the article by Dr. James Catterall, a psychologist and director of the Centers for Research on Creativity in Los Angeles. He describes an interesting finding that emerged from as they were testing their new survey on measuring creativity:

Elementary school kids scored better on it than high school kids did. “I think the expression that many people use is that the schools have a tendency to suck the creativity out of kids over time,” he says.

As Ken Robinson said, in his TED talk:

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